The Benefits of “Page-Turn Wait Time”

The Benefits of “Page-Turn Wait Time”

A few months ago, my husband came out from reading with the girls before bed and announced that storytime had gotten significantly more meaningful because he decided to simply sit and wait at the end of a page. He wouldn’t turn the page himself, he’d just wait until either the girls turned it themselves or asked him to turn it…

As a teacher, I read many many studies about the benefits of increased “wait time” (the time between when a teacher asks a question and a child answers it) to the quality of students’ thinking and responses. Studies show, in fact, that “the length of student responses tends to increase at least threefold” when the wait time is at least 3 seconds. “Student responses tended to be more substantive, including more thorough argumentation and less mimicry of what the instructor had already stated. On top of all that, increased wait time appears to be directly related to increased student motivation!” (from https://ucat.osu.edu/blog/value-awkward-silence-increasing-wait-time-classroom/).

And we’ve seen the same thing in our house when we let the girls lead in terms of how quickly we move through a picture book! The girls notice more about the illustrations (which are often integral to the story in a picture book), they ask insightful questions about the characters or plot, and they make more connections to the stories. We learned from this that, as adults, we tend to move through picture books at our reading speed, which is WAY too fast for children to process the story, and WAY too fast for them to take in all the details given through the illustrations.

Fast-forward to early April, when I finished The Enchanted Hour by Meghan Cox Gurdon (you can read my full review here), and she addresses this exact phenomenon. She writes:

With children’s picture books, it can be tempting for adults to flip through the pages at the pace of the prose… Looking with intensity, or “close looking…” calls for a change of gears, or a downshift. “If we want to be able to make the most of a picture— to be open to it and wonder why we feel as we do in front of it— we need to look not just as what’s being represented but rather at everything that presents itself, and grasp at the how as well as the what… The more you know, the more you’ll be able to discover and the more meanings you’ll be able to make.” (page 165).

How do you pace your picture book read-alouds? Are you willing to have your “page-turn wait time” feel a little awkward for the benefit of your children?

Early Readers Written in Dialogue (aka Elephant and Piggie Style!)

Early Readers Written in Dialogue (aka Elephant and Piggie Style!)

A follower recently asked me for recommendations for books similar to Elephant and Piggie— yes, she wanted that early reading level, but she was NOT looking for silly, funny, friendship books. Instead, she wanted books written in the same dialogue format, as their kindergartener likes to do “theater” of the Elephant and Piggie books at night… (side note— this kind of reader’s theater is wonderful for developing fluency!).

So, up today, books written in the same dialogue style, for the same early reading level, as the beloved Elephant and Piggie books! Continue reading “Early Readers Written in Dialogue (aka Elephant and Piggie Style!)”

The Enchanted Hour by Meghan Cox Gurdon

The Enchanted Hour by Meghan Cox Gurdon

So, it’s no real secret that I love Jim Trelease’s The Read-Aloud Handbook (and by the way, a new edition is being released in September— you better believe I’ve already preordered mine!). So, when a dear friend told me she had seen a book I’d probably love sitting front-and-center on the counter of our local bookstore, I turned around immediately to buy it.

And y’all, The Enchanted Hour: The Miraculous Power of Reading Aloud in the Age of Distraction is inspiring, too! Meghan Cox Gurdon has written this with a great combination of both personal anecdotes about reading aloud with her own children and data, statistics, and insights from current research around brain development, technology, and reading aloud. I marked an incredible number of passages for my own future reference or to share with my husband. Gurdon also includes 11 pages of recommended titles for read-aloud! Continue reading “The Enchanted Hour by Meghan Cox Gurdon”

Honoring Early Writers

Honoring Early Writers

Notice any special publications on the bookshelf above? Our kindergartener has been writing like a fiend lately… Books upon books upon books, multiple publications each day. Now, for those of you who know me personally, you know I don’t save much of the girls’ artwork for sentimental purposes. But, if you’ve been following me for a while, you know I believe 100% in the power of displaying— and therefore honoring— children’s work. And if you saw my post a few weeks ago, you also know I’m working to embrace fully my girls as readers and writers rather than writing off what they’ve accomplished as “developmental” or even sheer memorization. Continue reading “Honoring Early Writers”

Viewing Early Literacy Through a “Reading” Lens

Viewing Early Literacy Through a “Reading” Lens

A few weeks ago, I took our girls to a “reading to furry friends” event at our local library. Going into it, I figured our kindergartener, who is just starting to read independently, would enjoy picking out a book she’s familiar with and reading it to the dogs. And I assumed the 3.5-year-old would just be along for the ride, as she usually is… Continue reading “Viewing Early Literacy Through a “Reading” Lens”

Subconcious Messages Through Children’s Book Choices

Subconcious Messages Through Children’s Book Choices

If you have children or work with children, you probably know they LOVE to listen to the same story over and over… and over… again. In fact, one of the earliest literacy tip posts I did on Instagram was about the benefits of repeated readings!

Pictured above are 3 books that have been on heavy repeat in our house these last few weeks. They’re all drastically different, with different characters, plots, and themes. And this variety made me wonder— do these book choices tell me anything important about my children? Would paying more attention to those choices would give me a little window about what my girls are processing or needing right now? Continue reading “Subconcious Messages Through Children’s Book Choices”

Literacy Sensory Bins

Literacy Sensory Bins

If you know me well, you know that I don’t teach my own children to read before kindergarten (nor do I spend time teaching my kindergartener to read when she’s home from school). I believe in play, in exploration, and in a literacy-rich environment. So, my girls LOVE to “read” and to listen to books, but our oldest didn’t read independently before kindergarten. Our youngest might not either. And that’s just fine with me, as long as they’re excited about words, reading, and writing.

So, what do we do instead? We read aloud… a lot. We have books around for the girls to “read” on their own… a lot. And we play! We play for fun. We play to build social skills and to learn about the world. And we play with words and letters. Continue reading “Literacy Sensory Bins”